ICE Full Fat – awesome trike – minor issues

Mojave Bigfoot 04

This monster backcountry trike is as close to perfect as one could want! There are no significant complaints about it. Two minor issues are readily solved:

Click HERE to read the entire article and see all the photographs!

IF YOU ARE AN EXPLORER AND ADVENTURER, THIS TRIKE IS FOR YOU! These rigs are exciting, and liberating. Lose your limits – go wild!

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About trike hobo

Steve Greene is a naturalist, philosopher, and teller of tales. He pursues absolute truth in all things, modifying his existence as supported by legitimate evidence. His ideological foundation rests on the respect of life, as he follows a path of health, serenity, and maximum functional longevity. He has authored eleven books, and is a noted authority on Death Valley National Park, human powered recumbent cycle touring, fitness and longevity, and professional law enforcement. Steve has not owned a petroleum powered automobile since 2008, as part of his environmental preservation paradigm. He eats an organic vegan diet, exercises regularly, and enjoys exploring the wilderness. Harmony with nature tops his priorities. To learn more about Steve, please visit: http://wildsteve.wordpress.com
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5 Responses to ICE Full Fat – awesome trike – minor issues

  1. keith ambury says:

    Steve,

    Great article on the shortcomings of the full fat. Did you ever get a response from Schwalbe with regard to the tires
    I would use caution in over tightening the any cam lock system as it can result in bolt deformation and thread stretching. If this occurs in the back and beyond on your travels you could cause a bolt failure resulting with a long walk. Trikes are not fun to lug around!!
    I speak from experience on the issue as the shop that assembled my my HP Velotechnik Scorpion over tightened the rear wheel of the trike. One day on a ride the wheel came loose, which is a tad nerve racking on a high speed corner. No serious damage and the repair was as as easy as replacing the skewer. I am told that the correct tightness should leave a light imprint on the heel of your hand.
    What tires did you buy to replace the Schwalbe’s with, and are they heavier/more durable when in a similar situation to where you had your failures.

    Happy Trails and safe journeys,

    Keith Ambury.

    Sent from my iPad

    >

  2. Ian johnstone says:

    Hello Steve,
    Have you thought about trying the tyres that are on the Azub fat trike, they appear to have more tread.
    Best wishes
    Ian

  3. wild steve says:

    Hi Keith,

    I have received no response from Schwalbe, and it is unlikely I will, as I am but a tiny subset of an already tiny subset of riders: Few people yet ride fat tire trikes off road, and those who do typically use them for day rides close to home or a vehicle backup. I’ve said my piece, and have walked away from pushing things any further, learning a lesson that ICE would be well advised to eliminate for future purchasers (in other words, sending the trike out to new customers with a tubeless/Stan’s Sealant set right from the factory).

    The stock factory setup with tubes and Jumbo Jims has been sent to the local dump on the trash truck. The replacement setup will be tires from the VEE tire company: one “Bulldozer” tire in the rear and two “VEE8” tires in front. All three tires will be tubeless, with Stan’s Sealant inside, as all reports I’ve been studying since the flat tire incidents have indicated that thorns will no longer be an issue. A good cycling buddy of mine, Matt Jensen, has been using a tubeless setup on his fatbike for many months now, and has not experienced one flat, so it seems like this is the way to go. I am hopeful ICE will realize this too, so that people don’t confuse the inferior tire issue with the superior trike. This has been a financially costly lesson for me, and I hope through these writings that others who follow will learn it before they end up stranded.

    The handlebars rotated when in serious off-road conditions, and no amount of human powered fingers could stop this. There was no rotation on dirt roads or mild backcountry, but at times pressure is brought to bear on the handlebar grips, and then one of the handlebars would rotate either towards me or away, depending on the direction it was being pulled or pushed. When I tightened them up gently with the pliers, the two little plastic liners they use to allow the cam to move more smoothly on the metal snapped and fell out, thus the cams are now metal on metal. Another option is to drill a small hole through the bar, and fix the bars with a bolt, however, this would make it quite a bit more time intensive to fold the trike for transport if necessary. So far, with slight plier pressure, things are working fine. It did require a cloth between the butt of my hand and the cam lever to get it closed.

  4. wild steve says:

    Hi Ian,
    The tires I will now be installing have considerably more lugged tread in their design. Follow the links to the VEE tire company to see the tires. I will also be using a tubeless setup with Stan’s Sealant inside, which should take care of this issue for good, from what I’ve learned in the past three weeks of educating myself on the options.
    http://veetireco.com/product/bulldozer/ (my new rear drive tire)
    http://veetireco.com/product/tire-7/ (my new front tires, only in the 4.0 size)

  5. Hi Steve…! I received on my subscription to gizmag today A article about a inner tube in which it inflates itself, and I immediately thought of you, and your recent misadventure to the Mojave Desert.. Well it seems this fella about three years back designed a self inflating tire which did not work out so well the first time around, but it seems as this fella is back again, and this time he’s ready for bear…! He has rethought the idea, and made some improvements, and now has a real working self inflating tire… Which if your tire should get a torn in it, and it starts to go flat, well as long as you are peddling, the tire will stay at the exact air pressure you prescribed on it’s valve stem for it to be at, and will only go flat when you are no longer riding.. Now this is not a cure for the flat tire but a bandage in which keeps you going till you can give it the proper attention it requires…! Now it may, or may not be the answer to all your problems, but it should be a good prophylactic investment to prevent, the worst from happening buy getting you to the next port of call, in which you may get the attention required for the problem tire at hand… I hope that this is of some use to you, and will give you a little more insurance of mind while riding your full fat trike on it’s next adventure…
    As always your respective reader, and like minded recumbent rider……Armadillozack
    Oh, and here is the link to that website as well, so it is to be, only one click away….!
    http://www.gizmag.com/pumptube-self-inflating-inner-tube/40902/?utm_source=Gizmag+Subscribers&utm_campaign=bae36ce106-UA-2235360-4&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_65b67362bd-bae36ce106-91824813

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