Overland Triker Enlightenment

            The more challenging the situation and the greater the demands made on an overland triker, the more sweetly the psychological savoring later in release from the anxiety. The probability of peril serves primarily to sharpen his awareness and control, and this may be the rationale of all risky undertakings. Adventurers deliberately raise the ante of achievement in order to clear their minds of everyday mundane minutia, to go beyond the box of traditional society, into a world where hasty miscalculations have the potential to radically alter the chances of survival. It’s a personal test with one’s self, where by risking going too far, we learn just how far we can go. We push the limits, sometimes just a little, other times a lot. Venturing outside the box, way outside, is the overland triker’s dream.

            There are trikers for whom the unattainable holds a special place of reverence. When they start out, they are by no means experts, yet their desire and ambition are powerful enough that they cast aside the doubts of others more rational than themselves. These overland trikers have common forces within them, those being dogged determination, great endurance, and unfaltering faith in themselves. Taken in its best light, such trike nomads are judged by the masses as eccentric, and in lesser scenarios, mad.

Desert Camp

            Why walk away from comfort and guarantees? This can perhaps be no better explained than the essence of what George Leigh Mallory told a newspaper reporter in 1924 while on a United States speaking tour, when pressed for an answer of why he was on a quest to reach the summit of Mount Everest: Because it is there! Determined trikers likewise envision and carry out expeditions because the personal challenge is there. They will never earn what they are capable of unless they chase down their limits and break through their imagined boundaries.

            Too dramatic of a comparison? Perhaps – for those who are not likely to pursue much outside their own marginal comfort zone – perhaps for those who have fallen prey to the media spin of the most extreme world adventurers, which tends to diminish what you and I may accomplish. Yet for those rare adventurers who are driven to personally stretch themselves, this essence of challenge is alive within. We may not climb Everest or walk to the magnetic North Pole, but we venture far beyond our normal life expectations on occasion, sometimes on a tricycle – just to see if we can. We know the feeling, and the resultant exhilaration. It simply doesn’t matter one iota how anyone else perceives us!

            Adventure is out there, way beyond the box. It need not be explained to those who do not open the lid to see what’s outside. Few ever do. The intangible rewards that come with adventurous personal achievements, especially those that appear during times of life regarded by most average people as old age, are the sweetest indeed. These challenges of adventure need not be of any level geared to impress the common human mind, for modern television has artificially raised the bar in the name of sensationalism and inadvertently trivialized what most adventurers are capable of, but only a level that satisfies one’s inner needs of accomplishment, excitement, and self worth. We set our own personal goals, meet them, exceed them, and set new ones. It keeps us feeling alive!

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Note: This text is also found HERE.

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About trike hobo

Steve Greene is a naturalist, philosopher, and teller of tales. He pursues absolute truth in all things, modifying his existence as supported by legitimate evidence. His ideological foundation rests on the respect of life, as he follows a path of health, serenity, and maximum functional longevity. He has authored eleven books, and is a noted authority on Death Valley National Park, human powered recumbent cycle touring, fitness and longevity, and professional law enforcement. Steve has not owned a petroleum powered automobile since 2008, as part of his environmental preservation paradigm. He eats an organic vegan diet, exercises regularly, and enjoys exploring the wilderness. Harmony with nature tops his priorities. To learn more about Steve, please visit: http://wildsteve.wordpress.com
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One Response to Overland Triker Enlightenment

  1. Down Wind Dan says:

    Hey Steve, that’s the best blog yet. I can see myself doing that even on shorter day trips. Triking is adventurous.

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