Trip Tip – Living Lost Time

That sounds hard to do, and in fact it is for the vast majority of people. The masses of first world countries are so consumed by their daily routines designed for the accumulation of wealth and status that they lose time on a regular basis, usually every day. Time is lost in a variety of ways, but for this Trip Tip, I wish to speak of perhaps the most common: while driving the car.

Most of us typically find ourselves in a hurry during our daily work and responsibilities, to such an extent that we can surely understand wilderness author Melissa Walker’s labeling of it as a “hurry sickness” that affects nearly everyone without their conscious comprehension of it. Who among us, while driving a car, isn’t either thinking of the past, or anxious about the future? Who isn’t thinking about their destination as they speed along in the automobile, totally consumed with just wanting to be at the other end of their drive for that errand or important meeting? People drive cars for one core reason: to get somewhere quickly and conveniently, rarely to enjoy the scenery or the trip itself. I know this because I did it for over 40 years. The car trip was simply a means to an end … get me to where I wanted to go, now!

Consider this: The time that most folks spend commuting in petroleum powered automobiles is lost time, that is to say, not used in any productive manner. It’s just a necessary thing to quickly arrive at another locale. We can’t do anything but just wait as the miles speed by with our foot on the accelerator (at least nothing legally or safely). Human powered recumbent tadpole trikes are different however! Those very few of us who ride them already realize that they are considerably slower than cars, so we tend to think differently while on them. The distance a car can travel in one hour, a triker would be lucky to travel in one day. Trike pilots are not consumed by hurry sickness, especially when taking an overland trike journey of many days or weeks. We have no choice but to pedal along in a different frame of mind. We enjoy the scenery, very up close and personal, as we have an abundance of time to view a particular landscape as we lowly and silently move through it. We are part of our surroundings, out in nature, not boxed up in a fast steel vehicle, apart from nature.

The time that we would have lost on a particular trip if in a car is time that we actually live on a trike, as we are pedaling and appreciating each moment of each mile. We do not lose time fretting about yesterday or worried about what tomorrow brings. Trikes have a way of bringing us into a more present and lucid state, elevating our consciousness about what life really is. Details are alive, and that life seeps into our very being. We can actually lose ourselves in periods where thoughts do not consume us, a place of elevated consciousness where we transcend the mediocrity, hypocrisy, and egoic states of everyone else flying by in their toxic two ton machines.

Trikes have immense life altering powers that we come to appreciate the farther we ride them. Sure enough, they’re a preferable solution to seeing a psychologist, and a whole lot cheaper too. They bring life into a more realistic focus for the long haul pilot, a state that local errand riding trikers may not yet know. So get out there and live lost time. Trikes! They’re just different … like the people who ride them!

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About trike hobo

Steve Greene is a naturalist, philosopher, and teller of tales. He pursues absolute truth in all things, modifying his existence as supported by legitimate evidence. His ideological foundation rests on the respect of life, as he follows a path of health, serenity, and maximum functional longevity. He has authored ten books, and is a noted authority on Death Valley National Park, human powered recumbent cycle touring, fitness and longevity, and professional law enforcement. Steve has not owned a petroleum powered automobile since 2008, as part of his environmental preservation paradigm. He eats a vegan diet, exercises regularly, and enjoys exploring the wilderness. Harmony with nature tops his priorities. To learn more about Steve, please visit: http://wildsteve.wordpress.com
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